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Lens review

2010-01-20
 

Nikon Nikkor AF 50 mm f/1.8D

5. Chromatic aberration

Chromatic aberration won’t be a big problem while working with the Nikkor 1.8/50. Its effects can be only seen near maximum relative aperture and that aberration decreases quickly on stopping down – by f/4.0 it already approaches a low level. On the other hand, though, rival constructions from Canon or Sony manage the aberration much better so the Nikkor’s performance seems to be just average against such a background.

Nikon Nikkor AF 50 mm f/1.8D - Chromatic aberration

One thing needs some clarification. Attentive Readers might be surprised by the fact that the aberration on a smaller D200 sensor is higher than on the D3x full frame. It’s an effect connected with the measuring units, adopted by us. If you expressed the aberration in pixels its level would be bigger on the D200. The problem with expressing the aberration in pixels is that such a method hurts cameras with smaller cells. Our method consists of giving percentage values, obtained by dividing the pixel measurement result of aberration by the dimension of a frame, also in pixels. It allows us to be independent of the pixels size but it also forces us to divide full frame measurements by a higher number with the effect of a lower percentage score; it can be seen on our graph.

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Nikon Nikkor AF 50 mm f/1.8D - Chromatic aberration

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