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Lens review

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 30 mm f/3.5 Macro

18 December 2016
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

The longitudinal chromatic aberration is not a serious problem. Its slight influence can be noticed near the maximum relative aperture but it would be difficult to carp about it seriously.

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 30 mm f/3.5 Macro - Chromatic and spherical aberration


The lateral chromatic aberration can be described in similar way – its performance depending on aperture values for both bodies we used in the test is presented below.

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Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 30 mm f/3.5 Macro - Chromatic and spherical aberration


You deal here with results on a level of 0.07–0.08%; these values are still low although close to the medium border. The Panasonic 2.8/30 Macro performed very much the same. It seems there’s nothing to worry about.

Olympus E-PL1, RAW, f/5.6 Olympus E-PL1, RAW, f/11.0
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 30 mm f/3.5 Macro - Chromatic and spherical aberration Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 30 mm f/3.5 Macro - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

The tested lens doesn’t have any „focus shift” effect. When it comes to appearance of defocused circles of light in front of and behind the focus there are no significant differences there. The image after the focus has the rim a bit more intensive but, by and large, it is the only symptom that spherical aberration might not be corrected in a perfect way.

Olympus E-M5 II, f/3.5, in front of Olympus E-M5 II, f/3.5, behind
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 30 mm f/3.5 Macro - Chromatic and spherical aberration Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 30 mm f/3.5 Macro - Chromatic and spherical aberration