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Lens review

Voigtlander Color Skopar 28 mm f/2.8 SL II

6 April 2013
Arkadiusz Olech

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration


Chromatic aberration

The traces of longitudinal chromatic aberration can be noticed at the maximum relative aperture. Our photo of the autofocus testing chart, presented below, shows slight yellow-green colouring of those areas which are situated behind the focus plane and slight pink-red colouring of those areas which are in front of the focus plane. It is not a significant effect and – what’s important – it disappears on stopping down.

Voigtlander Color Skopar 28 mm f/2.8 SL II - Chromatic and spherical aberration


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The lateral chromatic aberration can be problematic only on the edge of the APS-C/DX sensor, where its values reach levels considered by us as medium, momentarily increasing to high. Fortunately on the edge of full frame this aberration remains low.

Voigtlander Color Skopar 28 mm f/2.8 SL II - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Voigtlander Color Skopar 28 mm f/2.8 SL II - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Spherical aberration

The shape of the circles infront of and behind the focus differs noticeably. It means that the spherical aberration is not corrected in a perfect way. Fortunately the situation is not completely bad either - if it was very bad you would observe the “focus shift” and we didn’t notice such an effect. The first photo presented in this chapter is the proof.

Voigtlander Color Skopar 28 mm f/2.8 SL II - Chromatic and spherical aberration