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Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24-70 mm f/2.8G ED

2 April 2011
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic aberration

A lot of low-dispersion elements didn’t allow the Nikkor to become the leader of lateral chromatic aberration correction. Quite the opposite in fact – here it fares the worst of all. The Zeiss didn’t have any problems at all and practically never exceeded the value of 0.07%, keeping the level near 0.03% for most of time. The values measured for the Canon also fluctuated around 0.04-0.07%. Such levels of aberration are practically imperceptible in real life photos.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24-70 mm f/2.8G ED - Chromatic aberration

The Nikkor can boast of such achievements only at 70 mm focal length. There, at the maximum relative aperture, the aberration level reaches a bit over 0.07% and it decreases very swiftly on stopping down. At shorter focal lengths the aberration gets near 0.1% apart from the difficult combination of the wide angle and the maximum aperture, where we got the value of almost 0.13%.

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Once again we should keep the right standards for comparison. We are still talking about low and medium values. The Nikkor fares a bit worse than its competitors but even in the worst of cases its aberration can be described only as medium.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24-70 mm f/2.8G ED - Chromatic aberration

What’s more, the lens doesn’t have almost any problems with the longitudinal chromatic aberration. It can be seen quite well in the autofocus testing photos, presented in chapter 10.