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Lens review

Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 70-300 mm f/4.0-5.6

17 March 2010
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic aberration

Chromatic aberration won’t disturb us at all in the 70-200 mm range. It’s simply imperceptible at 70 and 130 mm; at 200 mm it increases a bit but still slightly. Only at 300 mm and the maximum relative aperture it reaches a high level. Fortunately on stopping down the aberration quickly returns to a medium level and then even to a low one.

Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 70-300 mm f/4.0-5.6 - Chromatic aberration

In this category the Canon fared better than the Olympus because it never exceeded the level of 0.11%. The Nikkor fared worse for a change because, in its case, this aberration’s level reached momentarily above 0.20%, and for most of focal lengths and apertures combinations it ranged from 0.14 to 0.16%. What’s interesting, the Sigma, 70-300 APO, being the cheapest among the compared lenses, also fared minimally better than the Olympus – it had a results very similar to the Zuiko lens but with slightly lower values. For example for the worst combination (300 mm aperture and f/5.6) the chromatic aberration in its case amounted to 0.12 %.

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Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 70-300 mm f/4.0-5.6 - Chromatic aberration