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Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 20 mm f/1.8G ED

18 October 2014
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

Small dimensions of the lens and its demanding parameters, not easy to construct, made us worried about the Nikkor’s vignetting correction. First, let’s check how it fared on a small sensor of the Nikon D7000.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 20 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting


There is no need to worry here. At the maximum relative aperture the brightness loss in the frame corners reaches a moderate level of 24% (−0.78 EV) and by f/2.0 it amounts to 20% (-0.64 EV). On stopping down to f/2.8 the problem is marginalized completely as the aberration is just 8% (-0.23 EV).

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Now let’s have a glance at the crops you get after attaching the Nikkor 1.8/20 to the full frame Nikon D3x.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 20 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting


This time the problems are clearly visible. Applying the maximum relative aperture you have to take into account a light fall-off as big as 49% (-1.92 EV) in the frame corners. By f/2.0 the vignetting still remains distinct, reaching 44% (-1.68 EV). A significant improvement can be seen by f/2.8, where the vignetting decreases to 28% (−0.94 EV). By f/4.0 that aberration becomes less bothersome, getting to 17% (-0.55 EV). Further stopping down makes the vignetting decrease by 2% more.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 20 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting