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A history of Sony Alpha - Minolta AF 85 mm f/1.4 G D versus Sony Zeiss Planar T* 85 mm f/1.4

22 December 2009
Szymon Starczewski

9. Ghosting, flares and transmission

The period of five years seems to be not much in optics; on the other hand, though, exactly in those years the anti-reflective coating technology moved forward by leaps and bounds. It can be seen on the transmission graph of the two tested lenses, presented below.


A history of Sony Alpha - Minolta AF 85 mm f/1.4 G D versus Sony Zeiss Planar T* 85 mm f/1.4 - Ghosting, flares and transmission

The Sony, although its task was more difficult with two more air-to-glass surfaces to cover, fares better here. In the most important range of the almost whole visible spectrum it records the results by 1-3% better than the Minolta. The latter is a tad better only on the red border of the visible spectrum, definitely less important here.

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The transmissions of both lenses are high as their build is correct in the sense of damping down unwanted flares so both of them cope well with the work against bright light. In both cases it is really difficult to get any light artifacts what can be seen in the examples below (first two from the Minolta, the next two from the Sony).

A history of Sony Alpha - Minolta AF 85 mm f/1.4 G D versus Sony Zeiss Planar T* 85 mm f/1.4 - Ghosting, flares and transmission

A history of Sony Alpha - Minolta AF 85 mm f/1.4 G D versus Sony Zeiss Planar T* 85 mm f/1.4 - Ghosting, flares and transmission

A history of Sony Alpha - Minolta AF 85 mm f/1.4 G D versus Sony Zeiss Planar T* 85 mm f/1.4 - Ghosting, flares and transmission

A history of Sony Alpha - Minolta AF 85 mm f/1.4 G D versus Sony Zeiss Planar T* 85 mm f/1.4 - Ghosting, flares and transmission