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Lens review

Canon EF 100 mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM

27 November 2009
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic aberration

The chromatic aberration graph, expressed in percentage terms (not in pixels) so independent of the pixel size, is presented in the picture below.

Canon EF 100 mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM - Chromatic aberration

As you see, on a small APS-C sensor this aberration reaches the border between small and medium level so it is not a serious problem. On the other hand we should remember that for the EF 100 mm F/2.8 model it didn’t exceed the level of 0.05%. The more expensive L lens fares a bit worse here.

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The difference between the 20D and 50D is also a very interesting thing. By and large the results should be the same, as the aberration is measured in the same place of the test chart and the difference between the sensors is just 0.1 mm. On the other hand you can never crop the picture in an exactly the same way, the sensors slightly differ in size, pixel construction and microelements. Apart from that, the difference reaches just 0.01% whereas the margin of measurement errors amounts to 0.003–0.005%. Fortunately it is not a big problem which can cause you a headache.

Other thing is important, though. The lens corrects the chromatic aberration at the full frame edge outstandingly and it is difficult to fault there because the level of 0.06% is low. So, apart from the brilliant resolution, the full frame offers us lack of chromatic aberration too.


Canon EF 100 mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM - Chromatic aberration