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Lens review

Voigtlander Nokton 58 mm f/1.4 SL II

29 September 2010
Arkadiusz Olech

8. Vignetting

Fast, wide-angle and standard lenses could show significant vignetting even on smaller APS-C/DX sensors; that’s why the results obtained by the Voigtlander 1.4/58 on the D200 are not bad at all. The thumbnails below show it very clearly.

Voigtlander Nokton 58 mm f/1.4 SL II - Vignetting


At the maximum relative aperture the light fall-off in the frame corners amounts to 28% (-0.96 EV). It’s by 3% higher than in the case of the Zeiss but by 2% less than in the case of the Pentax 1.4/55. On stopping down the aperture to f/2.0 we see the problems being eliminated completely because the vignetting decreases to an imperceptible level of 9%.

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Full frame is much more demanding and it can be seen very well in the photos below, taken on the Nikon D3x.

Voigtlander Nokton 58 mm f/1.4 SL II - Vignetting


Using the f/1.4 aperture we must take into account the fact that in the frame corners we might lose as much as 52% of light. You shouldn’t be bothered by that fact at all, though; if you think it’s a joke you must know that the rival Nikkor AF-S 1.4/50 loses 56% of light there and the Canon EF 1.4/50 – as much as 72%. The result of the Voigtlander, although high, still compares favourably with its competitors. On stopping down to f/2.0 the vignetting is still high because it reaches 36% and only by f/2.8 it decreases to an acceptable level of 18%. The aberration becomes imperceptible only on stopping down to f/4.0 - its level decreases to 8% there.


Voigtlander Nokton 58 mm f/1.4 SL II - Vignetting

Voigtlander Nokton 58 mm f/1.4 SL II - Vignetting