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Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 50 mm f/1.8G

5 July 2011
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

The new lens is bigger than its predecessor which might suggest less problems with vignetting. On the other hand it is optically more complex and has an in-built autofocus motor so the situation is not as unambiguous as it might seem at first.

On the smaller sensor of the Nikon D200 the older lens showed vignetting as high as 35%. How does the new model fare? Let’s have a look at the thumbnails below.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 50 mm f/1.8G - Vignetting

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There is slight improvement. At the maximum relative aperture the vignetting reaches a not very bothersome level of 28% (-0.95 EV) and it decreases to 21% (-0.69 EV) by f/2.0. On stopping down the lens by next stop we can marginalize the problem – the vignetting drops to 6%.

On full frame the Nikkor AF 1.8/50D had the maximum brightness loss in the corners getting to 41%. What’s interesting it is still a bit better result than that of the new model which, at the maximum aperture, shows vignetting on the level of 44% (-1.66 EV).

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 50 mm f/1.8G - Vignetting


On stopping down to f/2.0 the aberration decreases to the value of 37% (-1.34 EV). It can be noticeable by f/2.8, where it reaches 19% (-0.59 EV) but it disappears completely by f/4.0 (8%).

In this category, the duel between the new and the old lens ends up in a draw. The first one is a bit better on a smaller sensor, the second – on full frame.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 50 mm f/1.8G - Vignetting