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Lens review

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 25 mm f/1.4 ASPH.

5 September 2011
Szymon Starczewski

9. Ghosting, flares and transmission

The Leica company’s anti-reflection coatings have always enjoyed a very good opinion so looking at the transmission graph of the tested lens you can try at assessing how much of the original Leica remains in the Panasonic.

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 25 mm f/1.4 ASPH. - Ghosting, flares and transmission

The graph looks good because the level of 90% or higher is being kept in a quite wide wavelength range. We get here a slight inclination which means a bit more red than blue light gets to the detector but such an effect is, fortunately, not very pronounced.

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Taking into account the fact that we deal here with seven groups of elements, the number of air-to-glass surfaces which should be coated is 14. It means that in the centre of the visible spectrum the efficiency of coatings on one such a surface amounts to 99.3-99.4%. A loss on the level of 0.6-0.7% is not something you can boast about nowadays because the best coatings reach the efficiency of 0.2-0.3%. We feel a bit unsatisfied here.

The Leica DG SUMMILUX 25 mm f/1.4 ASPH works against bright light quite well. Near the maximum relative aperture there are almost no problems whatsoever. On further stopping down more problems appear but only when the sun is straight inside the frame. If you put it in the corner or right outside it, you can see no significant flares.

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 25 mm f/1.4 ASPH. - Ghosting, flares and transmission

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 25 mm f/1.4 ASPH. - Ghosting, flares and transmission

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 25 mm f/1.4 ASPH. - Ghosting, flares and transmission