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Lens review

Canon EF 14 mm f/2.8L USM II

17 November 2011
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

The thumbnails below show photos of a homogenously lit plane taken with the tested lens and the Canon 50D.

Canon EF 14 mm f/2.8L USM II - Vignetting


You can see there are no serious vignetting problems. At the maximum relative aperture that aberration reaches 22% (-0.70 EV) and by f/4.0 it decreases to an imperceptible level of 10%.

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The situation looks completely different on full frame and you can assess it looking at thumbnails below.

Canon EF 14 mm f/2.8L USM II - Vignetting


At the maximum relative aperture the vignetting reaches a huge level of 65% (-3.0 EV). On stopping down the aperture to f/4.0 we see this aberration decrease significantly but still it remains on a high level of 43% (-1.62 EV). The vignetting remains visible by f/5.6 and f/8.0, where it amounts to 28% and 20% respectively. Further stopping down doesn’t make the vignetting drop in a significant way because by f/11 and f/16 it still is about 19%.

Once again the expensive Canon 14L is worse than the cheap Samyang which, at the maximum relative aperture, showed the vignetting of 55% and on stopping down by 1 EV – that of 39%. The Canon should be seriously reprimanded once again.

Canon EF 14 mm f/2.8L USM II - Vignetting