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Lens review

Canon EF 70-300 mm f/4-5.6 IS USM

23 September 2007
Robert Olech

5. Chromatic aberration

As far as the chromatic aberration correction is concerned, the Canon 70-300 IS is closer to L-grade lenses than to any lens in its class. None of the aforementioned lenses however corrects the chromatic aberration perfectly.

Canon EF 70-300 mm f/4-5.6 IS USM - Chromatic aberration


In the Canon 70-300 IS the chromatic aberration for a 135 mm is almost absent and shouldn't bother us for a 70 and 200 mm focal length, where it reaches a moderate level. The tested lens for a 70-200 mm operates as well as a 70-200 f/4L.

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The greatest chromatic aberration is present for a 300 mm when it increases along with stopping down the lens from 0.08% to 0.11%. This behavior is very common too since in other zooms of the same class the aberration was the highest for a 300 mm. The worst operating in this category was the Canon 100-300 mm, which for this focal length had a chromatic aberration from 0.12 to 0.14%. The Sigma 70-300 APO had exactly the opposite behavior from the tested one. Here the highest aberration was for wide open aperture and reached a value of 0.12%. It decreased from that quite quickly along with stopping down the lens. Usually, for a 300 mm we use the area around the wide open aperture, I definitely prefer the Canon 70-300 IS, which for f/ 5.6 and f/8.0 has a smaller chromatic aberration than the Sigma marked with the obligated letters APO.

Canon EF 70-300 mm f/4-5.6 IS USM - Chromatic aberration