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50 years of Nikon F-mount – Nikkor-S 5.8 cm f/1.4 vs. Nikkor AF-S 50 mm f/1.4G

12 June 2009
Arkadiusz Olech

10. Focusing



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In this category, the advantage of the younger lens is evident. In its case we’re dealing with a quiet, fast and efficient SWM ultrasonic motor, which makes focusing in bodies like D200/D300 or D3x trouble-free. Without problems we can also go to manual focusing, moving a switch on both, the camera body and the lens. The manual focusing ring itself, although less convenient than in its elder brother, allows precise and relatively convenient work, with the aid of distance scale behind a pane of glass. Something we won’t find on the new lens is depth of field markers, which are visibly present on the chrome rim of Nikkor-S.