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Lens review

Canon EF 16-35 mm f/2.8L II USM

29 September 2009
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

A difficult combination of wide angle and a good fastness usually makes itself felt in the vignetting category. The EF 16-35 mm profits a lot here from the fact that it was designed to work on full frame – so on a small APS-C sensor it gives you nothing to complain about.

Canon EF 16-35 mm f/2.8L II USM - Vignetting


For usually the most difficult combination of 16 mm and f/2.8 the light fall –off in the frame corners is practically imperceptible as it amounts to only 12% (-0.36 EV). It even decreases to 10% on stopping down to f/4.0.

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What’s more interesting, in the case of the tested lens the vignetting level increases with the increase of the focal length. At 25 mm and wide open the frame corners are darker by 17% than the frame centre (-0.53 EV).

The problem disappears by f/4.0 where the vignetting level reaches only 7%. At the maximum focal length and by f/2.8 the frame corners brightness loss is 20% (-0.66 EV) and it decreases by just 5% on stopping down to f/4.0.


Canon EF 16-35 mm f/2.8L II USM - Vignetting

Canon EF 16-35 mm f/2.8L II USM - Vignetting