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Lens review

Tamron SP 70-300 mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD

4 February 2011
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic aberration

Let’s start with the longitudinal chromatic aberration. One glance at the photos of the autofocus testing chart, presented in chapter 10, and you know that the tested Tamron 70-300 mm VC doesn’t correct this aberration perfectly well. The objects situated before the focus plane have slight blue cast and these behind the plane turn yellowish.

The results presented by the lens in the case of the lateral chromatic aberration are shown in the form of two graphs below – the first presents the edge of the DX sensor and the second is for the edge of full frame.

Tamron SP 70-300 mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD - Chromatic aberration

Tamron SP 70-300 mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD - Chromatic aberration


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The results are similar to those of the longitudinal aberration so average at most. What’s interesting in most cases the chromatic aberration level is a bit higher on the edge of the DX sensor and it decreases approaching the edge of full frame. For most combinations of apertures and focal lengths the aberration keeps the borderline between average and high level.

In this category the Tamron loses to the Sigma and the Canon significantly but it fares better than the Nikkor, which at 300 mm was able to reach over 0.20%.


Tamron SP 70-300 mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD - Chromatic aberration