LensTip.com

Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 35 mm f/1.4G

10 February 2011
Arkadiusz Olech

8. Vignetting

Photos, taken with the tested lens on the Nikon D200, show that even on a smaller sensor the vignetting is noticeable. The thumbnails below are the proof of it.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 35 mm f/1.4G - Vignetting


At the maximum relative aperture the brightness loss in the frame corners amounts to 32% (-1.12 EV). Such a value is clearly visible. Fortunately on stopping down the aperture to f/2.0 we see this problem being largely eliminated because the vignetting is 14% (-0.44 EV) there. The aberration disappears completely by f/2.8 where its level gets to only 5%.


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The chart below shows how the tested Nikkor compares with its 35 mm focal length rivals.


Nikkor
1.4/35G
Canon
1.4/35L
Sony
1.4/35G
Nikkor
2.0/35
f/1.4
32%
32%
24%

f/2.0
14%
16%
11%
33%
f/2.8
5%
8%
4%
16%


Let’s describe now the full frame performance. The thumbnails of photos, taken on the Nikon D3x, are presented below.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 35 mm f/1.4G - Vignetting


The vignetting sticks out immediately. It would be difficult not to notice it if, at the maximum relative aperture, it reaches as much as 60% (-2.66 EV). The fans of magical vividness will be overjoyed. A shallow depth of field by f/1.4 combined with corners darker by almost 3 EV than the frame centre will certainly make the photos unusual vivid. Still the Nikkor can’t beat the Canon here because the Canon 1.4/35L had the light fall-off of over 3 EV. Speaking seriously it is the first testing category where the Nikkor beats the Canon distinctly.

Returning to our measurements we can say that the vignetting is still significant even by f/2.0 where it amounts to 44% (-1.69 EV). It can be also noticed by f/2.8 where it reaches 25% (-0.81 EV). It stops being a nuisance only by f/4.0 and f/5.6 where it is 15% and 11% respectively.

The chart below presents the comparison between the results of the Nikkor 1.4/35G on full frame and those of its rivals.


Nikkor
1.4/35G
Canon
1.4/35L
Sony
1.4/35G
Nikkor
2.0/35
f/1.4
60%
70%
59%

f/2.0
44%
50%
43%
46%
f/2.8
25%
35%
23%
30%
f/4.0
15%
27%
15%
21%


As you see the Nikkor and the Sony present a very similar level, being significantly better than the Canon. It is an interesting result because the Canon is physically the biggest lens here and the Sony – the smallest and exactly the smallest lens has the lowest vignetting.


Nikon Nikkor AF-S 35 mm f/1.4G - Vignetting