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Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8G ED

22 March 2011
Arkadiusz Olech

5. Chromatic aberration

In the case of ultra wide-angle zooms it is difficult to rein the chromatic aberration in, which is especially bothersome at the maximum relative aperture. In the case of the Nikkor 14-24 mm the standard was set very high because we deal here additionally with good f/2.8 fastness. We were even more impressed by the results we saw in the photos. In the 19-24 mm range the aberration is not bothersome as its level is low or medium at most. The biggest problems we will encounter for the combination of the maximum angle of view and f/2.8 aperture – the level of aberration reaches the borderline between medium and high values there.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8G ED - Chromatic aberration

The Sigma 12-24 mm, which is also designed for full frame and is distinctly slower, showed at the shortest focal lengths the aberration definitely above 0.2%.

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The full frame Sigma’s 17-35 mm performance was very similar to that of the tested Nikkor but the Sigma offers much narrower angles of view and f/2.8 aperture is available only at the shortest focal length.

To sum up the performance in this category should be assessed very positively. So far we haven’t tested a lens which, with similar parameters, would have better achievements.

14mm, f/2.8
24mm, f/2.8
Nikon Nikkor AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8G ED - Chromatic aberration Nikon Nikkor AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8G ED - Chromatic aberration