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Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8G ED

22 March 2011
Arkadiusz Olech

8. Vignetting

Here we observe a very interesting performance because the brightness loss in the frame corners is the lowest at the shortest focal length. At the maximum relative aperture it amounts to 23% (-0.75 EV) but on stopping down to f/4.0 it decreases to an almost imperceptible level of 11%.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8G ED - Vignetting

At 19 mm focal length and by f/2.8 the vignetting is 28% (-0.93 EV) and on stopping down to f/4.0 it decreases to 13%. By applying f/5.6 relative aperture the vignetting falls to the level of 9% which is imperceptible.

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A very similar situation can be observed at 24 mm focal length. At the maximum relative aperture the light fall-off in the frame corners amounts to 29% (-0.98 EV) and by f/4.0 it decreases to 12%. By f/5.6 the vignetting is practically unnoticeable (9%).

On the one hand we can feel a bit unsatisfied because a lens designed for full frame should perform better on a small DX sensor. On the other hand, though, the competitors didn’t fare distinctly better here either.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8G ED - Vignetting

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8G ED - Vignetting

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 14-24 mm f/2.8G ED - Vignetting