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Lens review

Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 35 mm f/1.4 ZE/ZF.2

28 June 2011
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic aberration

When it comes to the longitudinal chromatic aberration all 1.4/35 class lenses, tested by us, have experienced many problems. If you, like us, expected the Zeiss to set new standards here you would be left disappointed. The crops below show very clearly that the correction of the longitudinal chromatic aberration sets the Zeiss at the bottom, not at the top of the whole group.

Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 35 mm f/1.4 ZE/ZF.2 - Chromatic aberration

The problem is so serious that, while taking photos of white objects near the maximum relative aperture, you can easily notice purple hues and rims.

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The lateral chromatic aberration is much better corrected, though. Its level is medium near the maximum relative aperture and after stopping down it decreases to the borderline between medium and low values. Here the Zeiss distinctly prevails over the Nikkor, the Sony or the Canon but it loses to…the Samyang. The Samyang is exactly the lens which corrects the lateral chromatic aberration the best of all the group of 1.4/35 class instruments.

Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 35 mm f/1.4 ZE/ZF.2 - Chromatic aberration

Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 35 mm f/1.4 ZE/ZF.2 - Chromatic aberration