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Lens review

Samyang 24 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC

10 February 2012
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic aberration

The longitudinal chromatic aberration can be noticed at the maximum relative aperture. Its level is not high but certainly it cannot be called low either. What’s interesting, this aberration almost doesn’t change on stopping down the lens to f/2.0 and only by f/2.8 it becomes imperceptible.

Samyang 24 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC - Chromatic aberration

Glancing on a graph, shown below, you can see that the lateral chromatic aberration is almost not bothersome. Both on the edge of the APS-C sensor and on full frame it is corrected very well.

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Samyang 24 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC - Chromatic aberration


It is worth noticing here that, although the competitors fared in this category well, the Samyang got the best result. The aberration of the Canon 1.4/24 oscillated between 0.07-0.08% and in the case of the Nikkor AF-S 1.4/24 it momentarily reached almost 0.1%. When it comes to the Samyang almost all results are below the 0.07% level.

Samyang 24 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC - Chromatic aberration