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Lens review

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 50 mm f/2 ZF/ZK/ZE

28 January 2013
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration


Chromatic aberration

The longitudinal chromatic aberration is corrected in a right way. Off focus images have a slight colouring but that effect is not huge which can be seen in the photos below very well.

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 50 mm f/2 ZF/ZK/ZE - Chromatic and spherical aberration


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With the lateral chromatic aberration it is even better – the tested lens simply doesn’t have it. Throughout the whole range of apertures and in different areas on the detector the aberration never exceeds the negligible level of 0.020–0.021%. Taking into account measurement errors you can say that for most of combination the level of that particular combination is zero.

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 50 mm f/2 ZF/ZK/ZE - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 50 mm f/2 ZF/ZK/ZE - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Spherical aberration

Glancing at the first photo, presented in this chapter, you can notice that the lens doesn’t have any ‘focus shift” effect so there are no big problems with the spherical aberration. Still it is not corrected in a perfect way and the photos of defocused light circles provide the proof of it.

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 50 mm f/2 ZF/ZK/ZE - Chromatic and spherical aberration

The light layout in the circles is quite even with the exception of the very centre, which, in front of the focus is noticeably lighter than the surrounding area and behind the focus – darker. Its size is not big though so it doesn’t influence the image in a significant way.