LensTip.com

Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 70-200 mm f/4.0G ED VR

4 May 2013
Arkadiusz Olech

8. Vignetting

When you attach the Nikkor 70–200 mm f/4.0 VR to a reflex camera with the APS-C/DX sensor we can by and large forget about the problems connected to vignetting. The thumbnails below show it very well.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 70-200 mm f/4.0G ED VR - Vignetting


At 70 mm and by f/4.0 the light falloff in the corner of the frame amounts to just 15% (-0.47 EV). The vignetting disappears completely, its value reaches just 3% (-0.08 EV), after applying f/5.6 aperture. Almost identical situation can be seen at 135 mm focal length where, at the maximum relative aperture, the vignetting gets to 14% (-0.44 EV) and by f/5.6 it decreases to 3% (-0.10 EV). You can notice vignetting in real life photos only at the maximum focal length and by f/4.0 as the brightness loss is 27% (-0.88 EV) there. Fortunately the f/5.6 aperture eliminates that problem almost completely because it makes the vignetting decrease to a value of 7% (-0.20 EV).


Please Support Us

The coronavirus crisis has been adversely affecting many businesses and, sad but true, ours is not an exception. Despite that difficult situation we would like to preserve continuity and high quality of publications available on all our websites. Still, we are now aware it might be impossible without additional financial help. That's why we would like to ask all those who visit, read, and care about Optyczne.pl, LensTip.com i Allbinos.com for support - it's enough you send us a small sum of money via PayPal. If a lot people decide to support our websites we think we'll stand a chance and survive next months without any lasting harm. We count on your support and understanding, stay safe and be healthy.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - advertisement - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Now let’s check the performance on full frame.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 70-200 mm f/4.0G ED VR - Vignetting


At shorter focal lengths the vignetting still can be considered moderate. At 70 mm and by f/4.0 the light fall-off in the corners amounts to 24% (-0.81 EV). The aberration decreases to a level of 10% (-0.31 EV) already by f/5.6.

The vignetting gets higher when you pass to 135 mm – here, at the maximum relative aperture you must reconcile with the loss of 30% of light (-1.03 EV) in the corners. Applying f/5.6 aperture can limit this aberration to 15% (-0.46 EV). It becomes imperceptible only by f/8.0, where it reaches just 8% (-0.24 EV).

The biggest number of problems you are going to see at 200 mm focal length. By f/4.0 aperture the vignetting will be 32% (-1.13 EV). Stopping down the lens can increase this aberration to 16% (-0.49 EV). The problem disappears almost completely by f/8.0 where it is just 8% (-0.23 EV).

Our overall assessment of the tested lens’s performance in this category is positive. Its significant dimensions mean, among other things, the proper vignetting control.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 70-200 mm f/4.0G ED VR - Vignetting

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 70-200 mm f/4.0G ED VR - Vignetting

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 70-200 mm f/4.0G ED VR - Vignetting