LensTip.com

Lens review

Sigma A 60 mm f/2.8 DN

6 August 2013
Arkadiusz Olech

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration


Chromatic aberration

The Sigma A 60 mm f/2.8 DN doesn’t have any problems related to the longitudinal chromatic aberration. If you load the crops, presented below, into a graphic program and you increase the brightness you can notice a slight colouring of defocused areas but that effect is really slight.

Sigma A 60 mm f/2.8 DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - advertisement - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

When it comes to the lateral chromatic aberration the situation is perhaps even better than in the case of the longitudinal variant. Only at the maximum relative aperture its level can be described as low; at other apertures it remains negligible and virtually impossible to detect in photos. A round of applause for the Sigma constructors.

Sigma A 60 mm f/2.8 DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Sigma A 60 mm f/2.8 DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

The crops below show that there are no vital differences between circles of light you get before and after the focal plane. The pictures of the autofocus testing chart and the longitudinal chromatic aberration don’t feature any traces of ‘focus shift’. All those facts mean that the spherical aberration in the tested lens is corrected well.

Sigma A 60 mm f/2.8 DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration