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Lens review

Samyang 16 mm f/2.0 ED AS UMC CS

21 August 2013
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

Let’s check how the Samyang’s 2.0/16 vignetting looks on the sensor of the Nikon D7000.

Samyang 16 mm f/2.0 ED AS UMC CS - Vignetting


One glance is enough to say that it can bother you by f/2.0 and f/2.8 and then it becomes less problematic or even imperceptible. Our measurements confirm that impression. At the maximum relative aperture the brightness loss in the corners amounts to 42% (-1.58 EV) and is significant. By f/2.8 the vignetting is 23% (-0.77 EV), by f/4.0 it is just 15% (-0.47 EV). The aberration becomes imperceptible by f/5.6 and f/8.0, getting respectively to 10% (−0.30 EV) and 9% (−0.27 EV).

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Although 42% vignetting might seem like a lot, you should compare it with the results you can get on full frame. Here the appropriate equivalent will be 24 mm focal length and the Samyang company offers you the right lens for the comparison - the 1.4/24. In its case the vignetting by f/2.0 is 63% and by f/2.8 – as much as 46%. Both values are noticeably higher than the vignetting level of the Samyang 2/16.

As we mentioned full frame already – we decided to attach the Samyang 2/16 to the Nikon D3x. The photos taken with that set are presented in the form of thumbnails below.

Samyang 16 mm f/2.0 ED AS UMC CS - Vignetting


It is clear that the image circle of the lens is significantly smaller than full frame. The vignetting is so significant that I wouldn’t recommend joining the Samyang even with APS-H matrixes. That lens is designed only and solely to work with the APS-C/DX sensors and so it should be used.

Samyang 16 mm f/2.0 ED AS UMC CS - Vignetting