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Lens review

Carl Zeiss Otus 55 mm f/1.4 ZE/ZF.2

18 November 2013
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

Fast lenses usually experience a lot of problems with the longitudinal chromatic aberration. Still the ‘Apo’ letters on the casing of the Otus might suggest that aberration will be correct perfectly well. The thumbnails below show clearly that it is indeed the case. The level of the longitudinal chromatic aberration is very low and, in practice, it shouldn’t be problematic at all.

Carl Zeiss Otus 55 mm f/1.4 ZE/ZF.2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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When it comes to the lateral chromatic aberration the situation is not much worse. At the maximum relative aperture its level is low and on stopping down it becomes negligible.

Carl Zeiss Otus 55 mm f/1.4 ZE/ZF.2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Carl Zeiss Otus 55 mm f/1.4 ZE/ZF.2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration



Spherical aberration

Fast 50 mm lenses can have significant spherical aberration so near the maximum relative aperture the contrast of their images is noticeably reduced, making them look slightly misty. The constructors of the Otus, however, took care of the correction of that kind of aberration. As a result the lens doesn’t feature any “focus shift” and defocused light circles in front of and behind the focus look very similar.

Carl Zeiss Otus 55 mm f/1.4 ZE/ZF.2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration