LensTip.com

Lens review

Carl Zeiss Batis 25 mm f/2

15 September 2016
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

First let’s check how the lens fares on the smaller APS-C sensor – appropriate thumbnails are shown below.

A7R II, APS-C, f/2.0 A7R II, APS-C, f/2.8
Carl Zeiss Batis 25 mm f/2 - Vignetting Carl Zeiss Batis 25 mm f/2 - Vignetting


It would be difficult to speak about any serious problems. By f/2.0 the vignetting is moderate, reaching 28% (−0.94 EV), by f/2.8 it decreases to 14% (−0.45 EV). What’s interesting, further stopping down of the aperture doesn’t change the level of that aberration because by f/4.0 and by f/5.6 we got respectively: 14% (−0.43 EV) and 13% (−0.42 EV).

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Photos shown below are the proof that on full frame the vignetting becomes far more bothersome.

A7R II, FF, f/2.0 A7R II, FF, f/2.8
Carl Zeiss Batis 25 mm f/2 - Vignetting Carl Zeiss Batis 25 mm f/2 - Vignetting
A7R II, FF, f/4.0 A7R II, FF, f/5.6
Carl Zeiss Batis 25 mm f/2 - Vignetting Carl Zeiss Batis 25 mm f/2 - Vignetting


At the maximum relative aperture the brightness loss in the frame corners reaches as much as 62% (−2.78 EV). It is a huge value even if a bit lower than the result of the Distagon 2/25 tested by us on the Canon 1Ds MkIII. Both Zeisses should follow the example of the Nikkor AF-S 1.8/24G which, even if faster, had the vignetting on a level of 50%.

Let’s return to the Batis, though. Its vignetting is easy to notice also by f/2.8 where it reaches 45% (−1.75 EV). By f/4.0 it still remains visible, amounting to 39% (−1.43 EV). Then the stopping down of the aperture becomes rather ineffective: by f/5.6 you get 35% (−1.23 EV), by f/8.0 the result is 34% (−1.19 EV), and by f/11 we still got 33% (−1.18 EV).

Carl Zeiss Batis 25 mm f/2 - Vignetting