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Lens review

Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN

11 September 2019
Maciej Latałło

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

Longitudinal chromatic aberration is not corrected perfectly well because slight colouring of out-of-focus images is discernible even on stopping down. Still that problem is not big or even medium, especially that, with such a great aperture fastness, the standards were set very high in this category.

Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Now let's check how the Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN corrects lateral chromatic aberration – its performance presents a graph below.

Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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Here the tested lens fares beyond reproach – the majority of positions on the detector and aperture values generate results on a completely imperceptible level of 0.03%. A tad higher level, which still should be called low, you can observe near the maximum relative aperture and on the edge of the APS-C sensor.

A7R II, RAW, f/1.2 A7R II, RAW, f/5.6
Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

First photos, presented in this chapter, don't show any 'focus shift' effect but the correction of spherical aberration is not ideal. It's enough you glance at out-of-focus circles of light: the one before the focus doesn't feature anything alarming but the one after the focus has a distinct, bright rim.

A7R II, f/1.2, in front of A7R II, f/1.2, behind
Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration