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Lens review

Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN

11 September 2019
Maciej Latao

8. Vignetting

First let's check vignetting levels on the smaller APS-C sensor – appropriate thumbnails are shown below.

A7RII, APS-C, f/1.2 A7RII, APS-C, f/1.4
Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Vignetting Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Vignetting


In this case some problems can be experienced only in an area close to the maximum relative aperture. By f/1.2 vignetting amounts to 35% (−1.23 EV) and it decreases to 26% (−0.87 EV) on stopping down the aperture to f/1.4. By f/2.0 that aberration becomes imperceptible, reaching just 8% (−0.26 EV).

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After passing to a bigger, full frame sensor there are far more problems and the following photos show it pretty clearly.

A7RII, FF, f/1.2 A7RII, FF, f/1.4
Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Vignetting Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Vignetting
A7RII, FF, f/2.0 A7RII, FF, f/2.8
Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Vignetting Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Vignetting


Losses of light in frame corners are huge, by f/1.2 they amount to as much as 73% (−3.76 EV), and by f/1.4 they are still 66% (−3.15 EV). It is a very weak performance. It's enough to remind here that the Samyang AF 35 mm f/1.4 FE, a slower and smaller lens, by f/1.4 had a result of 64%, better than the Sigma after a slight stopping down to f/1.4.

By f/2.0 vignetting still remains very distinct, reaching 45% (−1.71 EV). A moderate level of that aberration can be observed only from f/2.8 onwards, with the light fall-off getting to 27% (−0.92 EV), and then it decreases by f/4.0 where we saw a value of 19% (−0.60 EV). Further stopping down didn't have any measureable influence on vignetting.

Sony A7RII, JPEG, f/1.2
Sigma A 35 mm f/1.2 DG DN - Vignetting