LensTip.com

Lens review

Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX AF 11-16 mm f/2.8

25 May 2009
Arkadiusz Olech

9. Ghosting and flares

In typical situations of shooting against the bright light, with the sun placed in the frame’s corner, Tokina behaves just as we expect from a lens of its grade. We can see the typical colorful arches and single flares around the center of the image. It’s nothing to panic about but it’s not perfect either. Sigma 10-20 mm did much better in this category.

Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX AF 11-16 mm f/2.8 - Ghosting and flares

Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX AF 11-16 mm f/2.8 - Ghosting and flares

Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX AF 11-16 mm f/2.8 - Ghosting and flares


The problem is, however, more significant than it initially seems to. While shooting outdoors, I crouched low on the grass to take a photo of railway tracks. Looking at the display, I noticed a very odd effect, as if the entire photo was covered with a mist. I was convinced a blade of grass had covered the front lens. I decided to retake the shot but it was the same. It turns out Tokina’s convex front element catches strong flares decreasing the contrast all over the frame by a great deal. Even when the source of light is far away from the field of view. It can be really frustrating as it utterly ruins our capture, as shown below.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - advertisement - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX AF 11-16 mm f/2.8 - Ghosting and flares