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Lens review

Panasonic G 14 mm f/2.5 ASPH.

16 November 2010
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

Small dimensions of the lens and the willingness to offer a better fastness than rivals is a perfect recipe for high vignetting. Let’s have a look at the thumbnails, presented below, to check how the Panasonic 2.5/14 fared in this category.

Panasonic G 14 mm f/2.5 ASPH. - Vignetting


As you see the problems are huge. Taking into account the small size of the 4/3 sensor, which makes it easier to design vignetting-free optics, it is a quite significant slip-up indeed. At the maximum relative aperture the lens loses as much as 49% of light in the frame corners (-1.97 EV). Unfortunately the stopping down of the aperture helps to a rather scant degree. When we stop down the lens to f/2.8 the vignetting decreases to 45% and by f/4.0 it amounts to 40%. By f/5.6 the brightness loss in the frame corners comes to 35% and by f/8.0 it reaches still a visible level of 32%. Even applying f/11 aperture we can’t get rid of that problem because then we still have the vignetting of 28%.

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It should be mentioned here that if you save photos in JPEG format, the vignetting values are by several percent lower – it is due to aforementioned cropping of images after correcting the distortion.


Panasonic G 14 mm f/2.5 ASPH. - Vignetting