LensTip.com

Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF Micro 60 mm f/2.8D

Nikon Nikkor AF Micro 60 mm f/2.8D
25 October 2007
Robert Olech

1. Introduction

Originally posted 2007-07-09 on Optyczne.pl

Nikon’s current offerings in the non-manual lens category are comprised of just three items: The AF Micro-Nikkor 60 mm f/2.8D, the AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor 105 mm f/2.8G IF-ED and the AF Micro-Nikkor 200 mm f/4D IF-ED. We have already tested the second one, which got very good results. However, the lens isn’t very popular on our market and the reason is invariably due to the very high price of nearly 800$, a result of the lens’s costly stabilization.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - advertisement - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Are DSLR camera users forced to use macro-produced lenses like the very good Sigma 2.8/70, Tamron 2.8/90 or Tokina 2.8/100? We don’t think so since there is still the AF Micro-Nikkor 60 mm f/2.8D on the market. As for a typical macro lens, its focal length seems to be a bit short. The impression could have been true when the lens entered the market in 1993, when the analog DSLR cameras – without digital competitors – ruled the whole market. When the DX detector format was introduced, the old lens was put in a completely new light. The lens, with its 1.5x multiplier, becomes a 90 mm equivalent of an analog instrument, which is very efficient for either macro photography or classic portraits. It doesn’t have stabilization and will not work with the D40/D40x DSLR cameras, but it has one big advantage – it is half the price of a 105 mm VR model and at the same price range as the other, aforementioned independent designer products.



Previous chapter