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Lens review

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 100 mm f/2 ZF.2/ZE

12 May 2014
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

The longitudinal chromatic aberration is noticeable near f/2.0-2.8 but it isn’t something terribly problematic as you can find out glancing at the crop below, shot by f/2.0. It is clear that images behind the focus have a slight yellow-green hue and those before the focus are tinted light purple.

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 100 mm f/2 ZF.2/ZE - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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The lateral chromatic aberration looks a bit better. Near the maximum relative aperture it is imperceptible. Its level increases with the stopping down but it never exceeds low values. In this category the lens should be definitely praised.

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 100 mm f/2 ZF.2/ZE - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 100 mm f/2 ZF.2/ZE - Chromatic and spherical aberration



Spherical aberration

The Zeiss 2/100 doesn’t have any ‘focus shift’ effect. What’s more, defocused images of light points you get in front of and behind the focus don’t differ much. The only thing you can notice is a bit different appearance of the very edge of the circles – the one in front of the focus smoothly decreases the light intensity as you move away from the centre and the one behind the focus finishes with a slight rim. For the major part of circles the light is spread very evenly, without any noticeable local extremes. All those remarks allow us to say that the spherical aberration is corrected in the right way.

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 100 mm f/2 ZF.2/ZE - Chromatic and spherical aberration