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Lens review

Samyang 12 mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fish-eye

30 December 2014
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

The photo below shows clearly that the tested Samyang manages to correct the longitudinal chromatic aberration very efficiently. It would be difficult to find a noticeable colouring of defocused images even far from the depth of field centre.

Samyang 12 mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fish-eye - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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The situation changes when the lateral chromatic aberration is discussed and you can find out that much by looking at the graph below.

Samyang 12 mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fish-eye - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Near the maximum relative aperture we observe values which should be called high. Only after stopping down the aperture by about 1.5 EV the aberration decreases to a medium level.

Samyang 12 mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fish-eye - Chromatic and spherical aberration



Spherical aberration

We didn’t manage to get circles of light of a sensible size in front of and behind the focus at the same time. A large depth of field makes it also difficult to check whether the tested lens has a ‘focus shift’ effect. Still as we didn’t notice even the slightest traces of spherical aberration we assume the Samyang 2.8/12 doesn’t have any serious problems with it.