LensTip.com

Lens review

Voigtlander Nokton 10.5 mm f/0.95

18 July 2015
Arkadiusz Olech

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

The longitudinal chromatic aberration is corrected quite well. Its small influence on the colouring of defocused images might be noticed at the maximum relative aperture but on stopping down the aperture by 1-2 EV that problem disappears practically completely.

Voigtlander Nokton 10.5 mm f/0.95 - Chromatic and spherical aberration


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There are no serious reservations concerning the lateral chromatic aberration correction either – a correlation between its values and aperture values presents a graph below.

Voigtlander Nokton 10.5 mm f/0.95 - Chromatic and spherical aberration


The results range from 0.09% to almost 0.11% and are considered medium by us.

Olympus E-PL1, f/0.95 Olympus E-PL1, f/4.0
Voigtlander Nokton 10.5 mm f/0.95 - Chromatic and spherical aberration Voigtlander Nokton 10.5 mm f/0.95 - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

It is obvious the Nokton 0.95/10.5 has problems with the spherical aberration correction. First, it shows a distinct “focus shift” effect. In crops presented at the beginning of this chapter you see it very clearly - after passing from f/0.95 to f/2.0 the depth of field shifts significantly toward the longer distance.

The circles created by defocusing light points don’t leave any doubts either. In front of the focus you get a noticeable light rim and behind the focus the edges are very soft, merging smoothly with the background. It is a classic symptom of spherical aberration.

Olympus E-M10, f/0.95, in front of Olympus E-M10, f/0.95, behind
Voigtlander Nokton 10.5 mm f/0.95 - Chromatic and spherical aberration Voigtlander Nokton 10.5 mm f/0.95 - Chromatic and spherical aberration