LensTip.com

Lens review

Tamron SP 45 mm f/1.8 Di VC USD

13 October 2015
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

First let’s check how the tested Tamron 1.8/45 manages in this category attached to the Nikon D7000 with a smaller sensor – appropriate thumbnails are presented below.

Nikon D7000, f/1.8 Nikon D7000, f/2.0
Tamron SP 45 mm f/1.8 Di VC USD - Vignetting Tamron SP 45 mm f/1.8 Di VC USD - Vignetting


Even without precise numbers it is clear there are no problems almost at all. At the maximum relative aperture the vignetting level reaches just 17% (−0.53 EV) and then it decreases to 12% (−0.38 EV) on stopping down the aperture to f/2.0. By f/2.8 there is practically no vignetting as its level reaches just 4% (−0.13 EV).

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - advertisement - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

During the launch of two new Tamrons there were declarations that even on full frame the vignetting would be low. It’s time for the reality check.

Nikon D3x, f/1.8 Nikon D3x, f/2.0
Tamron SP 45 mm f/1.8 Di VC USD - Vignetting Tamron SP 45 mm f/1.8 Di VC USD - Vignetting
Nikon D3x, f/2.8 Nikon D3x, f/4.0
Tamron SP 45 mm f/1.8 Di VC USD - Vignetting Tamron SP 45 mm f/1.8 Di VC USD - Vignetting


At the maximum relative aperture the vignetting can be noticed without any problems, reaching 37% (−1.32 EV). Is that level high? The results of its rivals might answer that question. By the same aperture value the Canon 1.8/50 STM got a result of 61%, and the Nikkor 1.8/50G 44%. As you see, the Tamron fares much better here.

When you stop down the aperture to f/2.0, the vignetting decreases to 32% (−1.10 EV). The aberration becomes low already by f/2.8 where it is just 17% (−0.54 EV) and it is practically imperceptible by f/4.0 (10% and −0.31 EV).

Tamron SP 45 mm f/1.8 Di VC USD - Vignetting