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Lens review

Samyang 21 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS

8 December 2015
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

At the maximum relative aperture the longitudinal chromatic aberration seems to be a bit bothersome and its level can be described as medium. It decreases slightly on stopping down the aperture to f/2.0 but even then it doesn’t disappear completely.

Samyang 21 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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The tested lens doesn’t have any problems with the lateral chromatic aberration for a change and the graph below shows it very clearly.

Samyang 21 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS - Chromatic and spherical aberration


The values we got range from 0.05 – 0.06% so they are slight. What’s important we didn’t notice any significant differences between the left and the right side of the frame.

Fujifilm X-E1, RAW, f/1.4 Fujifilm X-E1, RAW, f/5.6
Samyang 21 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS - Chromatic and spherical aberration Samyang 21 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS - Chromatic and spherical aberration



Spherical aberration

The tested lens doesn’t have any ‘focus shift’ effect. Additionally the circles of light we got in front of and behind the focus were very similar. If you combine this fact with an acceptable image quality at the maximum relative aperture you can conclude the spherical aberration is corrected in the proper way.

Fujifilm X-E1, f/1.4, in front of Fujifilm X-E1, f/1.4, behind
Samyang 21 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS - Chromatic and spherical aberration Samyang 21 mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC CS - Chromatic and spherical aberration