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Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED

15 December 2015
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

Fast Nikkors aperture-wise often don’t manage the correction of longitudinal chromatic aberration well. Fortunately the 1.4/24 model is an exception to that rule – it seems to fight that aberration quite efficiently. Its influence can be noticed but fortunately it is not very high and on stopping down by 1 EV stop it disappears almost completely.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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A lot of positive things can be also said about the correction of lateral chromatic aberration. Its performance, on both types of detectors, presents a picture below.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration


That aberration weakly depends on the type of the sensor, keeping everywhere the same level oscillating from 0.05 to 0.06%. Such values we consider to be low so we have no reservations here.

Nikon D3x, RAW, f/1.8 Nikon D3x, RAW, f/4.0
Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

The first photo in this chapter shows a slight ‘focus shift’ effect – it is clear that , when you pass from f/1.8 to f/2.5, the depth of field moves delicately behind. The appearance of defocused light circles also confirms there might be some problems with spherical aberration – the first circle has a noticeably darker edge than its centre and the situation is reversed in the second one.

Nikon D3x, f/1.8, in front of Nikon D3x, f/1.8, behind
Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration