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Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED

15 December 2015
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

First let’s deal with the vignetting performance on the smaller sensor of the Nikon D7000 – appropriate thumbnails you can see below.

Nikon D7000, f/1.8 Nikon D7000, f/2.0
Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting


At the maximum relative aperture you can notice that aberration but it is not especially bothersome, reaching just 24% (−0.81 EV). By f/2.0 it decreases to 20% (−0.64 EV), and by f/2.8 it stops bothering you at all, being just 8% (−0.24 EV).

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Now let’s check the more demanding full frame.

Nikon D3x, f/1.8 Nikon D3x, f/2.0
Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting
Nikon D3x, f/2.8 Nikon D3x, f/4.0
Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting


Using the maximum relative aperture means brightness loss of 50% (−2.00 EV) in the frame corners. By f/2.0 the situation is hardly better as the light fall-off gets to 45% (−1.71 EV). A moderate level of that aberration you can observe near f/2.8, where the vignetting amounts to 28% (−0.94 EV). It is still noticeable by f/4.0, where we got a result of 17% (−0.53 EV). Only by f/5.6 and f/8.0 apertures you can call the vignetting level negligible as it reaches respectively 12% (−0.38 EV) and 10% (−0.32 EV).

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 24 mm f/1.8G ED - Vignetting