LensTip.com

Lens review

Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM

26 August 2017
Arkadiusz Olech

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

Photos below prove that the tested lens doesn’t have almost any problems with the longitudinal chromatic aberration. At the maximum relative aperture and in blurry areas positioned further on you can find some slight colouring but on stopping down the lens to f/5.6 that slight effect disappears completely.

Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration

A very similar situation can be observed after attaching the Canon TC 1.4x III teleconverter – you don’t have to fear that type of optical aberration either.

Please Support Us

The coronavirus crisis has been adversely affecting many businesses and, sad but true, ours is not an exception. Despite that difficult situation we would like to preserve continuity and high quality of publications available on all our websites. Still, we are now aware it might be impossible without additional financial help. That's why we would like to ask all those who visit, read, and care about Optyczne.pl, LensTip.com i Allbinos.com for support - it's enough you send us a small sum of money via PayPal. If a lot people decide to support our websites we think we'll stand a chance and survive next months without any lasting harm. We count on your support and understanding, stay safe and be healthy.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - advertisement - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Now let’s check the performance concerning the lateral chromatic aberration – an appropriate graph is shown below.

Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Values below 0.04% we consider to be negligible so the correction of that aberration performed by the Canon EF 400 mm DO II can be only praised.

A very similar performance is observed after attaching the 1.4x teleconverter.

Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration


The results increased but only slightly and still are close to 0.04%. It seems no matter whether you work with the bare lens or you add the teleconverter to it, the lateral chromatic aberration won’t bother you in the slightest.

Canon 5D III, RAW, 400 mm, f/4.0 Canon 5D III, RAW, 400 mm, f/8.0
Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

First photos of this chapter don’t show any ‘focus shift’ effect. Light circles in crops presented below, which we got in front of and behind the focus, seem to be identical. The differences between them stem mainly from the fact of using DO technology, not because of spherical aberration. It seems the tested lens doesn’t experience any serious problems related to spherical aberration, especially that the image you get at the maximum relative aperture is of very good quality, properly contrasted and without ‘foggy’ areas which are typical for instruments with badly corrected aberration of that type.

Canon 5D III, 400 mm, f/4.0, in front of Canon 5D III, 400 mm, f/4.0, behind
Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Canon 5D III, 560 mm (TC), f/5.6, in front of Canon 5D III, 560 mm (TC), f/5.6, behind
Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration Canon EF 400 mm f/4 DO IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration