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Lens review

Sony FE 28 mm f/2

8 April 2019
Maciej Latałło

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

The tested lens doesn't lack low dispersion glass elements and that fact suggested it might deal with longitudinal chromatic aberration pretty well. Unfortunately something went wrong for optics constructors – the colouring of out-of-focus images is distinct and it's going to be quite bothersome not only during taking photos of testing charts but in real life too. Unfortunately, it remains visible even on stopping down the aperture to f/2.8.

Sony FE 28 mm f/2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration

What about lateral chromatic aberration – are we going to face similar problems? That question can be answered by consulting a graph below.

Sony FE 28 mm f/2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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Once again the majority of troubles you experience at the maximum relative aperture; partially they explain why the lens has weaker resolution results at that point, both in the centre and on the edge. On stopping down the aperture to f/2.8 you see that aberration becoming medium and from f/4.0 upwards you can talk about moderate or even low values.

A7R II, RAW, APS-C, f/2.0 A7R II, RAW, FF, f/11.0
Sony FE 28 mm f/2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration Sony FE 28 mm f/2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Spherical aberration

First photos of this chapter don't show any 'focus shift' symptoms so spherical aberration level can't be high or very high. The appearance of defocused circles of light suggest that the lens can't have any distinct problems with the correction of that aberration either so there are no reason to get worried.

A7R II, f/2.0, in front of A7R II, f/2.0, behind
Sony FE 28 mm f/2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration Sony FE 28 mm f/2 - Chromatic and spherical aberration