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Lens review

Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM

6 November 2019
Maciej Latałło

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

Longitudinal chromatic aberration is corrected well – it would be difficult to notice it in real life photos. The situation changes, though, after employing the teleconverter.

Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration


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Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration

You can describe the correction of lateral chromatic aberration in similar words and its performance, respectively on the edge of the APS-C detector and on the edge of full frame, show graphs presented below.

Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration


At 135 mm you deal with practically zero level of that aberration. On both ends of focal length spectrum and after attaching the teleconverter the results are a tad worse but still low enough, ranging from 0.05 to 0.07%. The improvement, stemming from the usage of the new teleconverter, is obvious. The older generation of the lens and the teleconverter could have lateral aberration of 0.15%, notably more pronounced and qualified as high.

In this category only the Nikkor AF-S 70-200 mm f/4.0G ED VR can compete with the Canon on equal terms as it didn't exceed 0.08% at any combination of focal lengths and apertures. The Tokina AT-X PRO FX SD 70-200 f/4 VCM-S and especially the Tamron 70–210 mm f/4 Di VC USD fared distinctly weaker

Canon 5D III, RAW, 70 mm, f/16.0 Canon 5D III, RAW, 135 mm, f/11.0
Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Spherical aberration

When it comes to focus shift it seems that you can notice a slight shift of depth of field toward greater distances in all photos presented here, so at 135, 200 and 280 mm. It indicates that spherical aberration might be corrected not perfectly well. Additionally, such a statement is endorsed by the appearance of out-of-focus circles of light we got before and after the focus. Once again in every case you see noticeable differences in intensity of rims around the circles.

Canon 5D III, 135 mm, f/4.0, in front of Canon 5D III, 135 mm, f/4.0, behind
Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration
Canon 5D III, 200 mm, f/4.0, in front of Canon 5D III, 200 mm, f/4.0, behind
Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration
Canon 5D III, 280 mm (TC), f/5.6, in front of Canon 5D III, 280 mm (TC), f/5.6, behind
Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L IS II USM - Chromatic and spherical aberration