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Lens review

Tamron SP 35 mm f/1.4 Di USD

20 November 2019
Maciej Latałło

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

The tested lens doesn't have practically any problems with the longitudinal chromatic aberration. Even at the maximum relative aperture and in out-of-focus areas positioned in greater distances it is difficult to notice any colouring of images. Still the rival lenses, mentioned earlier in our test, both Sigmas, the A 1.4/35, the A 1.4/40, and the Canon EF 35 mm f/1.4L II USM performed equally well. Only the Nikkor AF-S 35 mm f/1.4G lagged behind.

Tamron SP 35 mm f/1.4 Di USD - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Now let's check how the Tamron 1.4/35 corrects lateral chromatic aberration – the graph, showing its performance on both types of detectors and its correlation with aperture values is shown below.

Tamron SP 35 mm f/1.4 Di USD - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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The values we got here can be called low or very low but on the edge of the APS-C/DX sensor, on stopping down, they start to approach medium levels. It is a weaker performance than that of both Sigma lenses and the Canon as their typical results kept close to 0.03-0.04% but also distinctly better than the results of the Nikkor 1.4/35G which, momentarily, reached almost 0.20%.

Canon 5D III, RAW, f/1.4 Canon 5D III, RAW, f/8.0
Tamron SP 35 mm f/1.4 Di USD - Chromatic and spherical aberration Tamron SP 35 mm f/1.4 Di USD - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

First photos from this chapter show a very slight focus shift effect – it is clear that on stopping down the lens from f/1.4 to f/2.0 the depth of field moved toward greater distances. It means there are some problems connected to spherical aberration.

Defocused circles of light confirm that the correction of that aberration is not perfect. The circle before the focal point features a distinct bright rim and the one we got behind the focus doesn't have it. It's a classic symptom of spherical aberration and it means the optics cannot correct it properly. It is difficult to say whether it is a deliberate effect, connected to ensuring better appearance of out-of-focus areas, or the price you have to pay for a better correction or another optical aberration.

Still, it's worth mentioning that the level of spherical aberration cannot be high because if it was so the lens wouldn't be able to reach so good resolution values by f/1.4 and f/2.0.

Canon 5D III, f/1.4, in front of Canon 5D III, f/1.4, behind
Tamron SP 35 mm f/1.4 Di USD - Chromatic and spherical aberration Tamron SP 35 mm f/1.4 Di USD - Chromatic and spherical aberration