LensTip.com

Lens review

Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF

28 August 2020
Maciej Lata³³o

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

Photos below show clearly that the Batis doesn't have any problems with longitudinal chromatic aberration. Out-of-focus areas feature not especially visible colouring, no matter what aperture you employ.

Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Equally good results you can notice in the case of lateral chromatic aberration – its performance depending on the used detector and aperture values presents a graph below.

Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Please Support Us

The coronavirus crisis has been adversely affecting many businesses and, sad but true, ours is not an exception. Despite that difficult situation we would like to preserve continuity and high quality of publications available on all our websites. Still, we are now aware it might be impossible without additional financial help. That's why we would like to ask all those who visit, read, and care about Optyczne.pl, LensTip.com i Allbinos.com for support - it's enough you send us a small sum of money via PayPal. If a lot people decide to support our websites we think we'll stand a chance and survive next months without any lasting harm. We count on your support and understanding, stay safe and be healthy.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - advertisement - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


As you can see, the level of that aberration decreases slightly on stopping down the aperture. Still, even the maximum values never exceed 0.03-0.05% so a level considered by us as very low. It means photographs taken with the Batis should be free of any traces of chromatic aberration.

A7R II, RAW, FF, f/2.0 A7R II, RAW, FF, f/11.0
Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration

Spherical aberration

First photos of this chapter show a slight shift of depth of field toward greater distances on stopping down – it means the lens has some focus shift effect. Not perfectly corrected spherical aberration can be also noticed when you look at circles of light reached before or after the focus. One of them has a noticeably lighter rim than the other one – a classic symptom of spherical aberration.

A7R II, f/2.0, before A7R II, f/2.0, after
Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Taking photos from closer distance you can notice that, even at the maximum relative aperture, circles of light are not round, with visible aperture blades. That effect disappears only at greater distances (above 50 cm) but it shouldn't bother you. The Zeiss Batis 2/40 sticks out among its rivals with an exceptionally short minimum focusing distance so it is also plagued by features typical for macro lenses which, while taking photos from a close distance, are usually slower than their relative aperture, declared on the barrel, might indicate.

A7R II, f/2.0, 24 cm A7R II, f/2.0, 30 cm
Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration
A7R II, f/2.0, 40 cm A7R II, f/2.0, 50 cm
Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration Carl Zeiss Batis 40 mm f/2 CF  - Chromatic and spherical aberration