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Lens review

Sigma 120-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 APO DG OS HSM

20 October 2009
Szymon Starczewski

8. Vignetting

Owners of DSLRs with sensors of APS-C/DX format, mounting Sigma 120-400 mm OS, won’t have reasons to be bothered by vignetting.

Sigma 120-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 APO DG OS HSM - Vignetting


At the shortest focal length and the maximum aperture the light falloff in the corners amounts to 15% (-0.48 EV). After using f/5.6 aperture it lowers to a slim level of 3%.

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At 200 mm vignetting is practically unnoticeable even at the maximum aperture, where it totals 11% (-0.32 EV). At f/5.6 falls additionally to mere 7%.

A very similar situations is at 300 mm, where at the maximum aperture vignetting amounts to only 13% (-0.41 EV) and at f/8.0 falls to 3%.

The most potential problems this aberration will give us at the longest focal length, where at the maximum aperture it reaches the level of 19% (-0.62 EV). The problem disappears entirely at f/8.0 (8%).

In this category similarly good, or even better results were recorded by Canon 100-400 mm IS and Tokina 80-400 mm.


Sigma 120-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 APO DG OS HSM - Vignetting

Sigma 120-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 APO DG OS HSM - Vignetting

Sigma 120-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 APO DG OS HSM - Vignetting

Sigma 120-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 APO DG OS HSM - Vignetting