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Lens review

Samyang 135 mm f/2.0 ED UMC

5 July 2015
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

As you can notice in crops below the tested lens doesn’t have the slightest problems with the longitudinal chromatic aberration correction. You don’t have to stop down the aperture because even the image you get at the maximum relative aperture is practically completely free from any traces of that aberration.

Samyang 135 mm f/2.0 ED UMC - Chromatic and spherical aberration

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You can describe the correction of the lateral chromatic aberration in similar terms. Its performance, depending on the aperture value and the detector you use, presents a graph below.

Samyang 135 mm f/2.0 ED UMC - Chromatic and spherical aberration


The aberration doesn’t exceed a level of 0.03% in any place; that level we consider to be very low. Also in this category the Samyang passes our test with flying colours.

Canon 5D III, f/2.0 Canon 5D III, f/16.0
Samyang 135 mm f/2.0 ED UMC - Chromatic and spherical aberration Samyang 135 mm f/2.0 ED UMC - Chromatic and spherical aberration



Spherical aberration

The first photos in this chapter don’t feature any “focus shift” effect so the spherical aberration level cannot be high. That conclusion is additionally confirmed by the appearance of defocused light circles. The only flaw you can notice here is a softer edge of the image we got in front of the focus and a lighter rim of the circle behind the focus.

Canon 5D III, f/2.0, in front of Canon 5D III, f/2.0, behind
Samyang 135 mm f/2.0 ED UMC - Chromatic and spherical aberration Samyang 135 mm f/2.0 ED UMC - Chromatic and spherical aberration