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Lens review

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 105 mm f/1.4E ED

26 November 2016
Arkadiusz Olech

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

Fast optics produced by Nikon very often experiences problems with longitudinal chromatic aberration. The constructors of that Nikkor didn’t manage to correct it in a perfect way either. The aberration is visible without special problems. Even on stopping down the aperture to f/2.0 you can notice a slight colouring of out-of-focus images.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 105 mm f/1.4E ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration


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A significantly better situation can be observed when it comes to the lateral chromatic aberration and the graph below shows it clearly.

Nikon Nikkor AF-S 105 mm f/1.4E ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration


In the majority of cases we got results below 0.04%; it means you won’t have the slightest problems with that aberration.

Nikon D3x, RAW, f/1.4 Nikon D3x, RAW, f/4.0
Nikon Nikkor AF-S 105 mm f/1.4E ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration Nikon Nikkor AF-S 105 mm f/1.4E ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

The first photo in this chapter shows that when you pass from f/1.4 to f/2.0 the depth of field moves slightly toward the longer end of the focal scale. That effect is not especially pronounced and the object of your photo still remains sharp. Taking into account the fact that defocused light circles we got in front of and behind the focal point look practically the same and the quality of images by f/1.4 is very high it would be difficult to call the spherical aberration other than vestigial.

Nikon D3x, f/1.4, in front of Nikon D3x, f/1.4, behnid
Nikon Nikkor AF-S 105 mm f/1.4E ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration Nikon Nikkor AF-S 105 mm f/1.4E ED - Chromatic and spherical aberration