LensTip.com

Lens review

Sigma C 56 mm f/1.4 DC DN

22 December 2018
Maciej Latałło

5. Chromatic and spherical aberration

Chromatic aberration

The tested lens, despite its good aperture fastness, doesn’t have any problems with correcting longitudinal chromatic aberration. Out-of-focus images are barely tinted, even at the maximum relative aperture; in our opinion that aberration shouldn’t be bothersome in real life photographs at all.

Sigma C 56 mm f/1.4 DC DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration


When it comes to lateral chromatic aberration we present its performance, depending on aperture values below.

Sigma C 56 mm f/1.4 DC DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - advertisement - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


There are no problems whatsoever as values near 0.06% we describe as just low. The maximum level of chromatic aberration, reaching 0.063%, appears close to f/2.8 aperture so exactly where the lens experiences most of problems on the edge of the frame.

Sony A7R II, RAW, f/1.4 Sony A7R II, RAW, f/2.8
Sigma C 56 mm f/1.4 DC DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration Sigma C 56 mm f/1.4 DC DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration


Spherical aberration

It would be difficult to spot any symptoms of ‘focus shift’ in first photos of this chapter. Also the appearance of defocused circles of light seems to be beyond reproach – the ones we reached before and after the focal point are very similar, their only difference being a bit more intensive rim of the circles after the focus. All these facts mean the tested Sigma doesn’t have any problem with correction of spherical aberration.

Sony A7R II, f/1.4, in front of Sony A7R II, f/1.4, behind
Sigma C 56 mm f/1.4 DC DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration Sigma C 56 mm f/1.4 DC DN - Chromatic and spherical aberration