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Lens review

Sigma S 70-200 mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM

30 April 2019
Maciej Lata³³o

11. Summary


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Pros:

  • solid, sealed and stylish casing,
  • excellent image quality in the frame centre across the whole focal range,
  • very good image quality on the edge of the APS-C/DX sensor,
  • good image quality on the edge of full frame,
  • lack of problems connected to longitudinal chromatic aberration,
  • slight lateral chromatic aberration,
  • moderate distortion,
  • properly corrected coma,
  • not bothersome astigmatism,
  • low vignetting on the APS-C/DX sensor,
  • nice out-of-focus areas,
  • silent and accurate autofocus,
  • good cooperation with the 1.4x teleconverter,
  • rich accessory kit (caps, tripod adapter, petal-type hood and a hard case).

Cons:

  • high vignetting on full frame,
  • performance against bright light leaves a bit to be desired, especially at 200 mm and after attaching the teleconverter.

Even though the predecessor, so the Sigma 70–200 mm f/2.8 EX DG APO OS HSM, could compete on equal terms with its brand name rivals, Sigma still found several fields with a room for improvement. The Sigma S 70-200 mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM doesn't perform noticeably better in the frame centre but it certainly prevails on the edge of both the APS-C/DX sensor and full frame. The difference becomes especially distinct after attaching the teleconverter1.4x and at 70 mm, a focal length which, in the case of the predecessor, was simply weak.

A very long list of advantages and just two flaws (both of them fairy predictable to be honest) mean that Sigma specialists definitely know how to produce optics of excellent quality. Not only the Art series of primes should be considered the proof but also zooms aimed at professional photographers like the Sigma S 70-200 mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM.