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Lens review

Sigma 70-200 mm f/2.8 II EX APO DG Macro HSM

15 September 2009
Szymon Starczewski

5. Chromatic aberration

What’s interesting, in this category Nikkor 80-200 mm f/2.8 came out the best, in its case chromatic aberration never exceeded the level 0.09%, and in most combinations of apertures and focal lengths reached 0.07% at most. Nikkor 70-200 mm VR came out only slightly worse, just reaching 0.10% at the maximum aperture and the ends of focal lengths. In its case most combinations of apertures and focal lengths recorded results below 0.07%.

Beside these good results, the predecessor of Sigma came out poorly, all the more so if we take into account the presence of the letters APO in the name. Aberration was the lowest at the maximum aperture where it reached around 0.1% and at all focal lengths increasing with stopping down, sometimes reaching the large level of 0.17%.

Sigma 70-200 mm f/2.8 II EX APO DG Macro HSM - Chromatic aberration

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As you can see from the graph above, Sigma 70-200 mm f/2.8 II behaves very similarly. Again, the changes of the construction and adding one low-dispersion element didn’t help much, or maybe even harmed, because the maximum recorded results reach 0.19% (although for this minimum increase the measuring errors can be blamed).

After adding a converter the situation in this category becomes very poor, because, after stopping down (what is necessary to get fairly sharp images), aberration reaches a huge level of 0.26%.

Sigma 70-200 mm f/2.8 II EX APO DG Macro HSM - Chromatic aberration